Now!

This morning I went for a walk with my camera. Come follow along…

I decided to go out with just the X-T2, the 35 f2, an extra battery and use the ACROS+R film simulation. These are the lightly post-processed jpegs.

In Paris it was hot and we walked 70 miles in six days. While I liked the range of the 18-55mm lens, I found it was too heavy for me. I was surprised because it is really not a weighty lens. In addition to the heat, my choice of a slim camera strap may have been the source of the problem.

Since we returned, I have been thinking about a smaller camera. Then I use the Fujifilm X-T2 again and it feels good in my hands. The viewfinder is so much better than the more smaller cameras I have used in the past.

I decided to go back to prime lenses. The f 2 series of Fujifilm lens are small and light. I will just have to get over my aversion to changing lenses on the go. I have the 35mm and 50mm. I plan to buy the 23mm. These in the small 5L Peak Design sling bag will be light and give me a range of focal lengths I am comfortable using.

I have for a long time felt I could not see any good photographs to take. I thought I broke out of the slump in France (more trip photos will be posted here), but it seemed to return upon coming home.

This past week I read Daido Moriyama’s How I Take Photographs and was inspired by his snapshot philosophy. While I don’t see or photograph like him, I followed his advice to go out and take photos.

Today’s efforts are not art, but I am happy with them.

holga experiments

Last Saturday I received a package from Hong Kong with a Holga lens for my Panasonic Lumix G3 digital camera. I thought I would see what the plastic 25 mm lens could do. It has a fixed f8 aperture and minimal focusing capabilities. The photographs ended up being sharper than I expected. It was kind of fun and I will definitely try it again. Next time I will add the wide angle adapter that I have for my Holga film camera to see what kind of images the hi-fi camera with lo-fi lens can make.

city hall

branches

san luis obispo library

bird house